The paperclips didn't need a sales pitch. Neither do your clients.

SELLutions

How to Land Your Dream Job

by Admin 13. February 2012 13:56
I recently had the opportunity to be a guest on a radio show. I was caught a little off guard when I was asked, while on the air, how to use “selling skills” to get a job. I hesitated, since that really isn’t what I do. Since the radio host was familiar with my program, he felt there was a lot of synergy. After I did the show, I got to thinking about the idea he brought up, and how getting a job really is so similar to sales... And life.

Here are five steps to help you land the job of your dreams:

§  Network. Use the contacts that you have as extra eyes. Let them know what you are looking for. Be specific and get out there.

§  Set up one-on-one meetings with people that you know. Get coffee, a drink, etc. Help people understand what you are looking for, and give examples of the type of organizations and specific job descriptions. Again, make sure you are specific. People can’t think for you, even though you think they can.

§  When applying for a job, you must do something unique. Today, there are just too many people looking for the same job you are applying for. So, how do you rise above the rest? Sending a resume is so last century. I would suggest that you try to be different. One way is to send your information (resume, if you must) in a unique way. For example, I was once applying for a job with Procter & Gamble. I was in college (about 100 years ago,) and the career center had the interviews set up, but P&G booked up quickly. So, I called ahead and found out who was coming to do the interviews. I silk-screened my resume onto a T-shirt, rolled it up and slid it into a Colgate toothpaste box, and mailed it to the sales director, signature required. I got the interview.

§  When you are set up to be interviewed, do lots of research in advance. Spend time researching the company and interviewer. Create questions about the organization’s vision, what customers/clients say about them and what competitors say about them. Ask the interviewer about their experience with the company, what they like best about the organization, their job, etc. This gives lots of good insight to how the employees feel, and shows you have a real interest in them, too.

§  Follow up. There are several ways to do this. I think e-mail is fine, but does that really differentiate you? Here’s an idea: A talking e-mail. You can talk into a video e-mail message and really make an impression. Try www.talkinemail.com. I love it and have been using it a ton.

Remember, the best time to look for a job is when you already have one. If you are in a situation where you are out of work, your job is to look for a job eight hours a day, five days a week!

Greta Schulz is president of Schulz Business SELLutions in West Palm Beach, FL. She is the author of "To Sell is Not to Sell" and a columnist for business journals around the country. Greta does corporate training for Fortune 1000 companies and she has an on-line training course for entrepreneurs.

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How to Land Your Dream Job

by Admin 13. February 2012 13:53

I recently had the opportunity to be a guest on a radio show. I was caught a little off guard when I was asked, while on the air, how to use “selling skills” to get a job. I hesitated, since that really isn’t what I do. Since the radio host was familiar with my program, he felt there was a lot of synergy. After I did the show, I got to thinking about the idea he brought up, and how getting a job really is so similar to sales … and life.

Here are five steps to help you land the job of your dreams:

§  Network. Use the contacts that you have as extra eyes. Let them know what you are looking for. Be specific and get out there.

§  Set up one-on-one meetings with people that you know. Get coffee, a drink, etc. Help people understand what you are looking for, and give examples of the type of organizations and specific job descriptions. Again, make sure you are specific. People can’t think for you, even though you think they can.

§  When applying for a job, you must do something unique. Today, there are just too many people looking for the same job you are applying for. So, how do you rise above the rest? Sending a resume is so last century. I would suggest that you try to be different. One way is to send your information (resume, if you must) in a unique way. For example, I was once applying for a job with Procter & Gamble. I was in college (about 100 years ago), and the career center had the interviews set up, but P&G booked up quickly. So, I called ahead and found out who was coming to do the interviews. I silk-screened my resume onto a T-shirt, rolled it up and slid it into a Colgate toothpaste box, and mailed it to the sales director, signature required. I got the interview.

§  When you are set up to be interviewed, do lots of research in advance. Spend time researching the company and interviewer. Create questions about the organization’s vision, what customers/clients say about them and what competitors say about them. Ask the interviewer about their experience with the company, what they like best about the organization, their job, etc. This gives lots of good insight to how the employees feel, and shows you have a real interest in them, too.

§  Follow up. There are several ways to do this. I think e-mail is fine, but does that really differentiate you? Here’s an idea: a talking e-mail. You can talk into a video e-mail message and really make an impression. Try www.talkinemail.com. I love it and have been using it a ton.

Remember, the best time to look for a job is when you already have one. If you are in a situation where you are out of work, your job is to look for a job eight hours a day, five days a week!


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A Great Salesperson is Not Your Best Manager

by Admin 6. February 2012 16:43

The most common questions I think I get, hands down, are: “Greta, where do I find a good sales manager?” or “Who on our team do you think would be a good manager?” Most of the time, they take their best salesperson and promote him, or they take somebody who has been in the field or sold before and hire her. What happens? Well, I’ll tell you: More often than not, it’s unsuccessful. To illustrate why, I’m going to tell you a story about Evan.

I work with a very prominent, high-end Web design company, one of the largest in the country. It has a wonderful reputation, and its salespeople are skilled, though they needed to learn some process. So the company hired me about a year and a half ago.

The sales manager they had was absolutely fabulous at sales – one of the best I’ve seen. And when I taught them my sales process, most of them – and certainly him – took to the process like a duck to water. The sales manager, named Don, took this process and made it his own. He totally got it, he understood it and he started selling like nobody’s business.

Well that’s great, but how were the others doing? They weren’t really hitting their potential. Why? Because they weren’t really being managed. Now, don’t get me wrong. Don was one of the best salesmen I’ve ever seen, but management and sales are two completely different things. So the owner and I sat down and talked. I said: “You know, I think you are holding Don back by making him a sales manager. He could be not only your top salesperson, but he could make a heck of a lot more money, and I don’t think he enjoys what he’s doing.” He said: “Well, what do you think we should do?”

Now, before I talk to you about Evan, I want to tell you a little bit about how the organization works. They have salespeople who will go out, cultivate the business, gather it, get it to a point where they have some technical conversation ready to happen, and then they have what they call “business consultants” come in to talk more on the technical side. That being said, their salespeople and their business consultants were both involved in my training and both learned the process.

But Evan, who was a business consultant, learned the process inside and out. Why? In my opinion, it’s because he’s a real process-oriented guy. Most salespeople believe whatever they want to believe, but Evan believes one plus one equals two.

So, when I suggested to the owner, Jeff, that he should make Evan the sales director, he almost fell over. He looked at me like I had three heads, and told me that Evan had never been in sales before. I said that’s precisely it. What I meant was that most of us think incorrectly about what we need in a sales manager.

A sales manager does not need to be the best salesperson because, unless you can teach someone through osmosis how to sell, that particular skill is not transferrable unless it is taught and accounted for. Even if they could articulate it, it really doesn’t make any difference because it can’t be repeatable and made accountable for unless it has steps to follow. Here is why Evan is a good sales leader:

  • Strong coaching. He could coach because he didn’t have his ego all tied up in “when I was a salesperson, this is what I would do.” He was a coach because he understood that coaching through a particular process allows for repeatable, accountable success and a clear understanding of what went wrong if a sale isn’t made.
  • It takes leadership. A leader is somebody who doesn’t tell someone what to do, but asks questions and gets them to realize what they should do. Evan was very skilled at this because the most intelligent people are the ones who ask, not tell. When someone self-discovers an answer to a question, it becomes theirs. When it is theirs, they learn.
  • Keeping people accountable. This is the one that most sales managers miss on. Because they will allow a salesperson to say everything looks good when nothing is happening. So, the proper way to manage a sales group is by keeping them accountable by the activities they do. Coach them through each step of the sales process to get closer to the next step in the process, which is closer to the close.

After pondering this for a month or two, Geoff decided to make Evan a sales director for about 90 days to see how it went on both sides. It’s almost a year later, and it had to be the best decision they ever made. In one year, they went from $3.5 million in revenue to more than $5 million. I think I can take some credit for that, but Evan can take much more of the credit for keeping them accountable, coaching and leading them to success.

So, how are you going to find your next sales manager?

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Networking Faux Pas

by GSchulz 8. February 2011 23:57

Steve was a “good chamber member” by all accounts. He came to all of the functions; socialized with people he knew and always met the new members. He had been a member of the chamber for a number of years, so when the other members heard that he was not going to rejoin they seemed confused.

“Steve, I hear you’re not rejoining. What’s up?” “Well I have met some good friends and gotten some referrals but I feel like I should be getting more. I mean, I come to everything, I meet people, and I always tell them all about what I do.”

Does this sound familiar? Often when we join organizations, we think just being a member is enough. Even in Steve’s case he knew that he had to do more so he did. That should have worked right? Wrong!

The reason Steve focused on the referrals he’s getting is because he didn’t understand that building business through referral is about giving referrals, not getting them. Learning how to network is a skill. A skill is something we learn. There is truly a system for getting more referrals and poor Steve was just “winging it.”

Building relationships is the key to networking. The philosophy is “givers gain®"*. When we learn how to give to others we will sell more business.

There are some keys that will help you with this process. I have outlined a few:

1) How are you introducing yourself? When you are at a networking function you are competing with everyone else in that room to be remembered. “Hi I’m John and I’m a financial consultant”. The typical response will be, “Oh, that’s nice” (interpretation – I have no earthly idea of exactly what that means). It is important to help someone understand what you do in relation to him or her. Try, “Hi, I’m John. I teach people what to do to ensure early retirement” or “I help people play more golf and travel more often.” Sound different? Well isn’t that the point?!

2) What questions are you asking about them? Though others seem interested in what we do, really, they’re most interested in how it relates to them.

I can explain this best in a story.

About 8 years ago, my mom was telling me about her new friend Nancy. “Oh Greta, you have to meet Nancy, she’s terrific, she’s wonderful…” So, that Christmas eve we go to my mom’s house for a party. I walk in and I see this woman I don’t know with a big smile on her face come toward me. I said, “You must be Nancy.” “And you must be Greta,” she says. “I have heard so much about you. Your son is so well mannered, do tell me how you’ve done so well?” As I am dropping Christmas gifts on the floor to engage in conversation, she continues, “and your new home, I hear it’s beautiful, tell me about your decorating plans…” After a lengthy discussion about my favorite subject – me – I walked into the kitchen and said, “Oh mom, you’re right. I met Nancy and she’s terrific!”

It was much later I realized that I knew nothing about her, yet she impressed me. Why? hmmm, because she was talking about me perhaps?!

3) Create a picture. People see in pictures. Create a scenario in which they can see themselves. A chiropractor might say, “The next time you are playing golf and the ball goes one way and your back goes another, that’s when you call me”.

4) Ask the big question. The big question is one that will differentiate you for sure. Here it is:

“What would be a good referral for you?”

Simple. Yet it?s all about them. It is the reason they have come. They will then ask about you and your business. More about how to handle that later.

These are a few of the skills that will help you be a better net worker. Remember, it’s not net eat, it’s not net sit, it’s network.

*Givers Gain is a registered trademark of my friend and Founder of BNIDr Ivan Misner.

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